Trees you should avoid planting in your Brisbane garden

When the wrong species of tree is planted in your garden, it can become problematic for your home and property. All trees start small but before long they can grow in width and height and rage war with their roots, leaves and flowers!

Gardens and nature are supposed to create a sense of calm, so to ensure your tranquil tree planting plans don’t become a headache, you need to know what trees to plant and which ones you should avoid planting in your Brisbane garden, especially as some of these common trees may be your first choice!

Here are 4 popular trees to avoid planting in Brisbane

Fig Tree

Fig trees generally start as small indoor potted plants that are transferred to gardens when they outgrow the largest of pots. The problem with this is that they continue to grow, tall and wide! These 20 and 30 metre trees are accompanied by invasive roots that can be extremely problematic for pipes, walls, foundations and your garden space.

Bamboo

Often used to create privacy, certain types of bamboo, specifically types of running bamboo such as golden bamboo can spread and start to infiltrate unwanted areas. Ensure you choose a clumping species of bamboo if you’re set on using it in your garden.

Palm trees

A controversial tree to suggest to avoid in tropical Queensland, as palms can create that feeling of being on holiday all year round when in your garden. However, palms can cause problems as they require significant and ongoing maintenance, drop fronds and grow fruit that attracts bats that create mess. If a palm is a must for your garden, choose wisely and seek advice from the experts on which species you should choose.

Tipuana trees

These very large trees are classed as environmental weeds in Queensland, so it is advisable to have them removed if they’re in your back garden. They are much more suitable to parks where they can provide shade and their aggressive root systems won’t cause problems for your home.

Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn